Oct 22 2013

Free Energy and the Casimir Effect

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23 Responses to “Free Energy and the Casimir Effect”

  1. Kawarthajonon 22 Oct 2013 at 9:39 am

    “If free energy were real, someone would be making it happen. Ironically the very existence of the free-energy movement proves their own conspiracy theories wrong. If a company could produce a genuine free-energy machine, they would, and they would become the wealthiest company in the world. ”

    Oh Steve, how naive you are. The power companies and governments are actively suppressing the free energy movement, which is why no one has ever been able to bring it to the public before. You could have found this out if you had gone to RICHARD DOLAN’s talk about “RECLAIMING OUR DESTINY FROM A LIFETIME OF TRUTH SUPPRESSION”. ;)

  2. NNMon 22 Oct 2013 at 9:40 am

    What credentials do these people have….
    Looked up a random “speaker” (one of the few that actually said physicist), ended up on psi powers, mind over matter….
    Looking at their titles, they look more like business managers and artists.
    Then looked up another one (Dan Winter), and the first article I find, is a series of warnings that he claims to be a doctor, etc etc… But his criminal record by far exceeds his made up titles…

    Quote:

    1The Federal Court and the Bankruptcy court awarded the Tenens and Meru Foundation court costs for two separate actions. Meru and the Tenens did not sue for damages. Including interest, the amount Mr. Winter owes the Tenens and Meru Foundation is now over $120,000.

    2″Willful and malicious” is the precise legal term in English used by the Federal Court.

    3Mr. Winter paid $10,000 of the original $85,000 judgment against him directly to the Tenens’ and Meru Foundation’s attorney, at the close of court in 1998. He has paid nothing since.

    4In fact, Mr. Winter will be arrested by the US Marshal’s Service if and when he enters the United States via any US airport, or other border crossing, and transported to Rochester, NY.
    ” (end quote)

    So, who pays to listen to these bandits?

  3. ccbowerson 22 Oct 2013 at 10:49 am

    “Suppressed? You can Google it and find all the information you could ever want. How is this information suppressed?”

    The REAL information is suppressed. How do do I know? Because it is not there. They only let you see some of the information. The rest is suppressed. What information is suppressed? The information they don’t want you to know, which is the information that is missing. The fact that it is missing is evidence that it is suppressed.

    Conspiracy arguments always have circular reasoning/ begging the question. Much of conspiracy thinking can be described as a deficiency in detecting circular reasoning as a fallacy in addition to being easily compelled by patterns, while believing that the world is filled with horrible yet extremely competent people. Yet some conspiracy thinking has become more mainstream (Big Pharma supressing cures, JFK assasination, Roswell UFOs etc), to the point that it is believed without much questions or thinking involved among the general public. My perception is that conspiracy thinking has recently declined a bit in the U.S. I hope I am right. Although maybe it’s just that the conspiracies are changing.

  4. jasontimothyjoneson 22 Oct 2013 at 11:12 am

    This is the best thing I have found, on the advisory board STERLING ALLAN, Founder and CEO of the PES Network, Inc. and the New Energy Congress, on his own wiki page he has this http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Sterlingda#Discovered_Alphabetics

    Im lost for words

  5. Ori Vandewalleon 22 Oct 2013 at 11:46 am

    Conspiracy nuts within the the free energy movement are running a false flag operation to make the true free energy believers looks bad.

  6. TCKnighton 22 Oct 2013 at 11:56 am

    Commenting on the overlap between free-energy advocates and creationists: Perhaps one of the most dumbfounding revelations I ever heard uttered by a creationist was a rejection of the Second Law of Thermodynamic. Why? Because it suggested that EVIL (disorder) would eventually triumph over GOOD (order).

    Honestly, I sometimes don’t know what to say in those situations…

  7. steve12on 22 Oct 2013 at 12:47 pm

    “This device takes electromagnetic energy from curved space-time and outputs about twenty times more energy than inputted. The fact that these machines exist is astonishing, it’s even more astonishing that these machines are not implemented worldwide right now. ”

    So it’s completely engineered and working, just not in common use. Who wouldda thunk it?

  8. Bronze Dogon 22 Oct 2013 at 1:15 pm

    I’ve been watching a Let’s Play of Endless Space: Disharmony and went to the wiki to look at some of the technology that can be researched. “Applied Casimir Effect” is one of them, so it’s a mildly amusing coincidence that I find you talking about it here and now.

    If free energy were real, someone would be making it happen. Ironically the very existence of the free-energy movement proves their own conspiracy theories wrong. If a company could produce a genuine free-energy machine, they would, and they would become the wealthiest company in the world. Further, free energy would improve everyone’s quality of life. No matter who you are, your life would become better with free energy.

    I remember when I was just budding as a skeptic. I watched a show on the Philadelphia Experiment that claimed various geniuses (including Einstein, naturally) were involved in developing the time travel/phasing/whatever technology.

    Knowing something about the science those geniuses worked on and how easily we apply much of it made the assertion fall flat. It’s not like they’re secluded archmages who left behind encrypted tomes and powerful artifacts we can never hope to understand or recreate. They were just the first people to put together a few puzzle pieces. Today, we know why those puzzle pieces fit together and we’re adding onto their work.

    My conclusion after watching the show: If all those geniuses could do something like the Philadelphia Experiment over half a century ago, we’d have physics majors doing it today in their basement just to see if they got their math right. Similarly, if free energy machines were easy enough for non-physicists to build, we’d already have them on store shelves where batteries used to be.

    The problem with suppressing science is that you’ve got a bunch of people who are eager to push the universe’s jolly, candy-like red buttons just to see what’ll happen. There are governments and universities willing to pay them to do it. Those who document their more interesting results have a shot at winning fame and glory in the form of a Nobel Prize. Our centers of education exist to train these people to recognize the universe’s buttons, teach them the skills they need to push them, and rigorous methodology to understand the results. Many of them do this (the teaching as well as the button pushing) out of sheer passion for the subject, even though they won’t get wealthy from doing so.

    Yet, if you believe the conspiracy theorists, the soulless minions of orthodoxy recruit these people as mouthpieces for the status quo.

    One downside I can perceive with easy free energy devices is that they might contribute to global warming if used excessively. (Though they would obviously be able to replace the use of fossil fuels.) On the other hand, if we could get energy from nowhere, we could probably do the reverse and create a perpetual heat sink.

  9. worlebirdon 22 Oct 2013 at 4:15 pm

    @jasontimothyjoneson

    “…on his own wiki page he has this http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Sterlingda#Discovered_Alphabetics

    Oh man, he’s Mormon. I shouldn’t be surprised.
    Not all Mormons are nuts like this, of course, but I’ve met a disproportionate share who are. In fact, Dr. Steven Jones was the “Who’s That Noisy” on a recent SGU episode for his 9/11 conspiracy mongering – I took a 100-level physics class from him, and he was the bishop of my ward when I was going to BYU and still a Mormon myself.

  10. BillyJoe7on 22 Oct 2013 at 4:51 pm

    TCKnight,

    “Perhaps one of the most dumbfounding revelations I ever heard uttered by a creationist was a rejection of the Second Law of Thermodynamic. Why? Because it suggested that EVIL (disorder) would eventually triumph over GOOD (order)”

    That IS weird, because creationists usually use the Second Law of Thermodynamics against Evolutionary Biology.

  11. tmac57on 22 Oct 2013 at 8:08 pm

    Another conspiracy of suppressed free energy devices concerns the capture of thermonuclear based energy that freely radiates the earth,using silicon based receptors that turn it into electricity.They don’t want us to know about it,and it has been kept in total secrecy for well over a 100 years!

  12. ccbowerson 22 Oct 2013 at 9:46 pm

    “That IS weird, because creationists usually use the Second Law of Thermodynamics against Evolutionary Biology.”

    Yeah, that is more common, but really any argument that preserves the ideology will be more palatable than the reality that appears to contradict that ideology. That is similar to how conspiracy theorists tend to be open to multiple conspiracies, even contradictory ones. They are more interested in the ‘official explanations’ being wrong than any one conspiracy being right.

    Similarly, any argument that appears to counter the consensus views of evolution are embraced by creationists, but it is not the details of those arguments that they are attached to. They are more interested in making room for their creationist ideas rather than promoting particular arguments.

  13. locutusbrgon 22 Oct 2013 at 11:33 pm

    Oh I remember this, it is when the lost city of Atlantis flies around on zero point energy….
    Sorry I forgot, that was a well written fun fiction as opposed to this dreck.

    The implications of this are far reaching and have been written about extensively within theoretical physics by researchers all over the world. Today, we are beginning to see that these concepts are not just theoretical, but instead very practical and simply very suppressed.

    Very practical? Beginning to see?

    To quote a famous actor/mythbuster “I reject your reality and substitute my own!”

  14. Scepticonon 22 Oct 2013 at 11:46 pm

    “I wonder if anyone influential in the free-energy subculture realizes that their conspiracy-mongering over free energy is perhaps the greatest barrier to their being taken seriously.”

    I explicitly said this to a LENR troll who hangs out at the NZ science blogs site a couple of weeks ago, his response? more conspiracies.

  15. ccbowerson 23 Oct 2013 at 10:12 am

    Scepticon-

    You are just afraid that once that “LENR troll” exposes the true conspiracy, your checks from ‘Big Energy’ will stop, which of course is connected to Big Pharma, which is really run by I don’t know.
    I don’t know, therefore aliens.

  16. steve12on 23 Oct 2013 at 12:54 pm

    Someone copped to the conspiracy in the comments:

    “as a long time member of the Illuminati, I can tell you that these conspiracy theories are indeed quite real.

    About 10 years ago, I was having tea at the Bilderberg meeting with XDHTYIBFS, the alien who invaded Bill Clinton’s body during his presidency. I was complaining about the frequent inconvenience of getting gas (price was no object, of course, I have unlimited funds) when he said, “I’ll just give you my cold fusion engine – you’ll never need this primitive petroleum again!”. We laughed maniacally for 20 or 30 minutes and then brought in the strippers.

    The point is, the conspiracy is quite real. And”

  17. Scepticonon 23 Oct 2013 at 3:41 pm

    @ccbowers

    have to keep the reptilian overlords happy

  18. ccbowerson 23 Oct 2013 at 4:40 pm

    Kang and Kodos were exposed to millions many years ago, yet it is ignored as satire.

  19. Davdoodleson 23 Oct 2013 at 9:25 pm

    All the conspiracy hoo-ha in the world doesn’t explain why someone doesn’t just build an actual “free energy” machine, and put the matter to rest.

    Seriously, just build one. Not a fake one with hidden power cables, that you won’t let anyone examine. Not a fancy-ass flywheel in a vacuum that spins for an impressively long time, but will stop in short order it it even has to power a single LED.

    Build a real one. Just bloody do it, or quit being so damned silly.
    .

  20. Davdoodleson 23 Oct 2013 at 9:34 pm

    Also, what does “free energy” mean in this context?

    Are we talking about an entirely closed system from which energy can, forever, be extracted (a ‘perpetual battery’, as it were), or an open energy-in/energy-out system which relies on a “free” source of energy-in, for example solar power?
    .

  21. ccbowerson 25 Oct 2013 at 8:38 am

    Davdoodles-

    Take the concept of ‘free’ will and apply the treatment to energy. Any clearer? I didn’t think so.

    To address your question more seriously, I think the only meaningful definition is the first one you used, e.g. “perpetual battery.” It is meaningful (as a term) because it is clearly nonsense as it is looking for a loophole to get around the conservation of energy.

    The latter of your definitions is more useful since it is based in reality, but then the term “free” becomes meaningless. It is just looking for a better way to harness energy, which is what everyone is interested in. In that sense adding “free” to energy adds nothing but confusion.

  22. Bronze Dogon 25 Oct 2013 at 2:06 pm

    Also, what does “free energy” mean in this context?

    Are we talking about an entirely closed system from which energy can, forever, be extracted (a ‘perpetual battery’, as it were), or an open energy-in/energy-out system which relies on a “free” source of energy-in, for example solar power?

    Usually, “free energy” is synonymous with perpetual motion, where the energy is “free” in the sense of thermodynamics, rather than the market sense. Solar panels produce heat and electricity that is “paid for” by the energy in sunlight, so they don’t quality in this context, even though sunlight lacks a price tag.

    Free energy devices that hypothetically violate the first law by creating energy are essentially getting it for free, especially if you look at it as paying for itself and making an energy profit in the process. Those that hypothetically violate the second law are getting a free bonus from performing energy transactions instead of paying an entropy fee.

  23. Phil Newboldon 03 Nov 2013 at 1:53 am

    As some who is currently studying physics I find the free energy idea one of the most fundamentally silly ideas our species still holds on to. One of the most annoying parts of it is the dressing up of the “inventor” as some sort of scientist. I see too often some random joe blow wearing a lab coat in their YouTube video for no apparent reason. For instance our physics lecturer didn’t turn up for one lecture so we all watched and laughed at free energy promotional videos, there was one guy wearing a lab coat and pretty much solving a sudoku to “prove” his device works.

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