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The Girl Who Cried Baboon

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3 comments to The Girl Who Cried Baboon

  • You have to love when the primary message of a story is “don’t own monkeys as pets.” It’s an excellent lesson, even if Disney up there on their high horse won’t make a movie about it.

  • Nick Andrew

    Apropos to Moral #1, people in general need to adopt a more skeptical approach to reporting of unusual occurrences. A single cellphone photo is not evidence, nor a single reporter.

    Assuming some trust in the evidence or report, the response must be commensurate to the level of credibility. Perhaps a squad car could be dispatched to cruise the neighbourhood looking for the baboon. If it is located, further measures can be taken. One can’t adequately protect against a baboon which nobody (else) has seen and which could be anywhere in a suburb.

    That reminds me of a UFO hoax created by my uncles in the 1950s, in Melbourne. They plotted a fake trajectory of a fake spacecraft, and then had different people phone in sightings at different times and places accordingly. They were obviously expecting somebody in authority to do the math and derive a credible trajectory from these various reports. So that leads to Moral #4 – multiple reports which agree in the details can still be a hoax.

  • johntheplumber

    Re- Moral #3 – Don’t keep monkeys or primates as pets. They are potentially dangerous.

    I assume you apply this to all primates. –
    I already take particular care babysitting my two grand-daughters – but now you point it out, the adults are worse.

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