Jan 23 2014

Bigfoot Hoax – How Far Will It Go?

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22 Responses to “Bigfoot Hoax – How Far Will It Go?”

  1. oldmanjenkinson 23 Jan 2014 at 8:44 am

    Fantastical claims…. The picture of the head looks more like Gimli from LOTR. I always love that the only video “evidence” is from a grainy cell phone or poorly focused video cameras. Dyer will just keep moving the goal post.

  2. Kawarthajonon 23 Jan 2014 at 9:40 am

    I watched the video and the journalists seem to be making fun of him/laughing at him. He is obviously full of nonsense with his 120 “experts”, his BBC team and his refusal to let the journalists talk to the experts or to show any of the video. I think that the journalists did a pretty good job of calling him on his nonsense, while keeping the interview going.

    By the way, I found a real video of bigfoot – not grainy and he is clearly visible, if you can pay attention well enough:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vJG698U2Mvo

  3. The Other John Mcon 23 Jan 2014 at 10:30 am

    An infamous sighting of the “Blob-squatch” in grainy unfocused imagery

  4. ca1879on 23 Jan 2014 at 10:35 am

    At what point does this become a planned entertainment? If the fraud is so obvious and known to be, is it just pantomime and acceptable in the way of circus side shows?

    Also, Klingon? I think the Klingon version of that very old saying goes “Fool me once, earn a slow death.”

  5. Steven Novellaon 23 Jan 2014 at 11:16 am

    Well, Chekov insists the saying is Russian. Scotty doesn’t actually indicate its origin. You may be right about the Klingon version :)

  6. tmac57on 23 Jan 2014 at 11:49 am

    I think Dyer needs to bring in some well know authority with some gravitas to help his cause…Donald Trump maybe?

  7. ConspicuousCarlon 23 Jan 2014 at 12:21 pm

    It sickens me that Dyer wasted all this effort making up fake bigfoot stories when this exact same effort could equally have produced fake cancer cure claims.

  8. _Arthuron 23 Jan 2014 at 12:21 pm

    I think he say he shot that bigfoot 2 years ago, but he kept it a secret since.
    It takes time to study a stuffed wookie, I suppose.

  9. steve12on 23 Jan 2014 at 12:55 pm

    “He couldn’t just tell everyone that the government took bigfoot’s body – although, now, I guess, he can.”

    Actually he should have said this the first time. The VEnn diagram between Alex Jones anti-gov’t types and Bigfoot enthusiasts looks like a perfect circle.

  10. Enzoon 23 Jan 2014 at 2:13 pm

    Well…I, for one, can’t wait for the comparative anatomy paper on Hominidae Homopan pesenormis.

  11. tmac57on 23 Jan 2014 at 2:16 pm

    steve12-That’s pretty funny,but I was having similar thoughts as I read this.
    The bar for what is considered a plausible claim,and or source for reliable evidence has sunk so low for a certain demographic that it is mind boggling.
    I use to be able to counter obvious nonsense very easily by sending people to Snopes for example,but lately those spurious news sources that we are all too familiar with have developed an ‘immunity’ much as a virus does by deploying another rumor that Snopes is run and funded by left-wingers funded by George Soros,so therefore everything they say cannot be trusted,and essentially,ANY source that doesn’t agree with their unfounded rumor is by default wrong and part of the overall effort to silence their off-the-wall nutbaggery.
    So frustrating!

  12. BKHawkeyeon 23 Jan 2014 at 4:39 pm

    I don’t have much to add, other than it is disturbing that the first instinct of some hucksters is to kill this creature (or being, if we are willing to entertain the idea of other sentient creatures besides ourselves).

    Let’s just say for a second that this were real: why shoot something like this? Why not use a tranquilizer or try to capture it alive? This would be a fantastic discovery: actual proof of a bipedal hominid other than ourselves. And of course, being a Real American^TM, he murders it–I mean, stands his ground. If something like this ever turns out to be real, it will be real telling to see how many people choose to celebrate the discovery versus how many people choose to lament the sadness of once again driving a species to extinction.

  13. Will Nitschkeon 23 Jan 2014 at 4:55 pm

    It seems fairly obvious that Dyer is an attention seeker. And it’s working.

  14. BillyJoe7on 23 Jan 2014 at 10:33 pm

    The poster above needs a mirror.

  15. SteveAon 24 Jan 2014 at 7:29 am

    A review of the film ‘Shooting Bigfoot’ I found on IMDB.

    “In it, director Morgan Matthews follows three separate groups of Bigfoot hunters on individual treks. The results are edited together.

    Firstly there is Tom Biscardi, a man who has spent decades making documentaries about the subject. He is quite a highly strung fellow and somewhat self-important. Many of the funniest moments revolve around him and he has some very amusing dialogue throughout.

    Secondly there is Dallas and Wayne who are a couple of elderly hillbillies. They are much more sympathetic characters than Biscardi and it’s hard not to feel a little sorry for them in their dead-end obsession. They drive out into the woods to play cassettes and make animal noises in an attempt to lure in the beast. The walls of their home are full of photographs of evidence but truthfully they are photographs of nothing. Their obsession is given a little context in that a work injury left Dallas unable to continue in his job leaving him trying to find meaning for is life in the hunt for Bigfoot; it’s quite sad, although he does seem a undeniably little mentally unstable especially when he claims he has an affinity with Bigfoot because he has animal DNA as a result of a sheep bone being implanted in his head in order to seal a wound.

    Lastly, there is Rick Dyer who is a self-styled ‘Bigfoot Tracker’. He really seems to be a somewhat dangerous man and appears to engage in games with Matthews to try and freak him out in the middle of the night. The fact that he spends most of his time carrying a loaded rifle doesn’t exactly help matters. To make the situation worse they encounter a young homeless man in the woods who may or may not be secretly in cahoots with Dyer. But even if not, this guy gives off the impression of someone to keep well away from. One night he pitches up at the camp site with his dog horribly gashed at the neck. His ambivalence on the matter made you wonder if he was the one who actually did it. Anyway, this strand of the film is the only part that actually ends with any conclusion. Surprisingly, it’s a pretty scary one. Although it does push the documentary onto the ‘is-it-a-mockumentary?’ side of the fence.”

  16. steve12on 24 Jan 2014 at 1:23 pm

    Tmac57:

    “I use to be able to counter obvious nonsense…”

    You’re right – I think this has changed in the US in my lifetime (I’m 40). The people pushing identity politics have perfected their craft to the point where everything is Culture War nonsense, and truth and reality simply don’t exist unless they conform to some POV.

  17. DLCon 25 Jan 2014 at 6:39 am

    There has been a huge uptick in credulous “paranormal” TV “documentaries” in recent times, mostly (much to my dismay) on the History Channel and other supposed educational cable channels. Clearly this fellow wants his own “Reality” TV show. Let him line up with UFO-Balloon guy and the other fakes.

  18. BBBlueon 25 Jan 2014 at 11:57 am

    Is there a physiological basis for being gullible? When I was a kid, every shadow that moved across my window at night was a Yeti. I knew better, but regardless, my six-year-old brain would not rule out that possibility. Is that sort of irrational fear just a consequence of insufficient learning and world experience, or is there something physically different about a young brain that allows for such thoughts? My guess is most of us would agree that adult bigfoot believers are “different”, but are they really different in a measurable way?

  19. BillyJoe7on 25 Jan 2014 at 4:00 pm

    Human beings are hyperactive pattern-seeking, agent detecting, story telling creatures. It presumably increased the chances of survival in the forests and jungles of our ancestors. In our modern society, it’s probably a bit too hyperactive for our own good. But some of us haven’t learned to recognise and compensate for our less than perfect instinctual responses.

  20. norrisLon 27 Jan 2014 at 2:43 am

    Ludicrousity!

  21. TysonAdamson 27 Jan 2014 at 3:06 am

    Got coverage here in Australia on weekend morning news shows.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=E7_-rwjT44E
    Listen to the presenters trying not to laugh in the background.
    I’m annoyed they even gave this guy the time of day.

  22. zorrobanditoon 27 Jan 2014 at 8:11 pm

    Gotta love the Bigfoot stuff.

    We live about 2 miles upriver (Klamath) from Weitchpec, near the place where the iconic video was taken of “Bigfoot” stomping through the woods. Blurry, unsteady, a home video….supposedly taken near Fish Lake. All this country is unbelievably isolated, around the junction of the Klamath and the Trinity, in far northern California.

    The locals claim that the “Bigoot” in question was Billy Pearson, the Yurok Indian who runs the local store, and that the whole thing was an elaborate joke. I’ve known Billy Pearson all my life. He’s well into his 80′s now, but still strong and hardy.

    Billy refuses to discuss the question. Which is evidence in itself maybe.

    The old guys in the neighborhood have their own opinions. They say, if after a lifetime of tracking and leading mules and logging through all this country I have never seen evidence of this creature, it isn’t there. Of course they are all consummate hunters and trackers. They’re laughing at us, you guys.

    I’m with the locals on this one.

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